Milan Design Week 2014: The Quietly Colorful Home

Milan Design Week 2014: The Quietly Colorful Home

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From fashion to photography to furniture, recent years have seen a shift in the creative world’s overarching palette from highly saturated primary colors to a soft range of light corals, sea foams, baby blues, pale yellows and pinks. Some tones lean toward a more shimmery, nacreous vibe that melds well with iridescent glass, while others are definitively matte pastels that serve as harmonious accents in a neutral setting. Whether designed to complement the ongoing copper inflation or in response to our apathetic high-tech world, below is an assortment of quietly colorful design wares that we spotted during Milan Design Week 2014.

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With a set of steel sliding drawers sandwiching a pink marble top, Marco Guazzini‘s “Flamingo” console is a reflection of his research on movement. When the two drawers are pulled to opposite ends, Guazzini sees an “S” shape, reminding him of a flamingo’s curved neck, which inspired both the name and color palette.

Modeled after a sine wave’s regular tempo, the “Sine” clothing rack by young designers Kyuhyung Cho and Erik Olovsson keep clothes evenly spaced with its squiggly top rod and belts, scarves and small accessories organized thanks to three different styles of hangers.

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Dutch couple Scholten & Baijings recreated their 2009 Tilt-Top Table (originally conceived with Mathieu Meijers) for Danish design shop Hay in the idiosyncratic colors the duo has become so known for—deep pastels and perfectly tinted neons. The top of the tri-legged table can be unlatched for easy storage.

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For Wallpaper Handmade, two Prague studios teamed up for fantastic results. Designer Rony Plesl worked with Czech glassworks Verreum to create a range of silvered glass containers complete with a leather handle. Plesl is known for his talents designing with glass, and Verreum is equally recognized for their contemporary take on the traditional method of silvered glass-making, in which they use only high quality, pure silver to create the double-walled designs.

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Czech designers Jan Plecháč and Henry Wielgus flawlessly married “the elegance of crystal with the rusticity of a wooden form clinched with iron nails” in “Moulds,” a series of serene glass pendants with the LEDs inserted directly into the scorched oak mold. Designed for Lasvit, the display of overblown shapes in soft colors speak to the tradition of glassmaking in regard to the heat and energy involved in the process.

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Dutch designer Roos Gomperts showcased an update on her “Foam & Glass” series, which she originally conceived in 2013 and exhibited during Dutch Design Week. She tells us the new series see an improvement in the design: the glass is now blown in molds instead of by hand and the coloring in the foam will last much longer. “For me it was important to show the structure of the foam, and the possibilities in shape with this material. And of course foam and glass fascinated me in combination because foam is often used to protect glass, and now it becomes part of it.”

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